sales training in india

You are currently browsing the archive for the sales training in india category.

Frederic_Lucas

These conversations allow you to get an accurate understanding of the current state of your sales force while mentoring and coaching your sales managers. To get the answers you need, you have to ask the right questions at the right time. Here is our time-saving list of questions that every leader should ask of their sales managers at the specified intervals; by week, month, and quarter.

Seven Weekly Questions

As a business leader, you must have, at a minimum, one conversation per week with each of your sales managers. This weekly meeting should allow you to feel in control of your sales force and let you know whether more frequent monitoring is required. For example, if there is a newly-appointed sales manager, it is best to increase the frequency initially, so that you are touching base with them daily. Seven questions to ask your sales managers at least once a week:

  1. What has changed since our conversation last week?
  2. What is the status of our sales pipeline?
  3. What might prevent us from achieving our goals?
  4. In the team, which salesperson works best, and why? What might we reproduce with others?
  5. In the team, which salesperson works less well, and why? What is the action plan designed to help improve their performance?
  6. What are you coaching on this week and in what aspect?
  7. Who will you accompany on calls this week?

 

With these questions, sales managers will understand what actions they need to take each week to be able to provide satisfactory answers to you during your meeting the following week.

The wording of these questions intentionally leaves the door open to many types of answers. Sales managers who are well-prepared for the meeting should be able to respond accurately to broader issues. Indeed, a vague answer is often an indication of a problem.

For example, to the question about the status of the sales pipeline, a vague answer can mean the deliberate omission of problematic elements, or it may reveal a lack of competence. A sales manager who can interpret the pipeline will meet it with precision, following with a plan of concrete actions, not with excuses.

Six monthly questions:

Once a month, the conversation between the CEO and the sales managers must focus on emerging trends. These questions should include:

  1. Are we still confident of achieving our sales goals?
  2. Has there been enough activity during the month for us to reach our goals?
  3. Are the goals realistic? If not, they were set too high or too low?
  4. Are there still enough good salespeople on the team to do the work?
  5. Can you tell me some of the best selling lessons that your salespeople have given you over the past few weeks?
  6. Are there things that we have not seen in past months, that we see this month?

To identify other trends to be addressed, it is sufficient to analyze the responses to questions posed in the previous weeks. For example, if the weekly conversations during the past months have all focused on the same salesperson who is having difficulty, you should ask your sales manager about it. Ask her questions like:

  • Where are you with the recruitment of a new representative?
  • How do you expect to perform if the salesperson is not replaced in the coming weeks?

Four quarterly questions

Each quarter, the CEO must have a conversation centered on the medium-term planning with sales managers.

These questions include:

  1. What is your action plan for the next three months?
  2. What topics will you be communicating about with the sales team?
  3. What aspects of the sales process will you be coaching on, and why?
  4. How will you coach your team on these particular elements?

The questions will vary depending on the quarter. For example, the first months of the year are less busy, and representatives often fail to get appointments with potential new customers. Early in this quarter, the conversation will, therefore, focus on actions to get meetings with new clients. At the end of Q2, we will discuss the importance of building a larger pipeline, in anticipation of the slowdown caused by the approach of the summer holidays. And so on.

The One Essential Question for Every Meeting

Finally, in each of the three types of conversations described, every business leader should always ask the following question of their sales managers:

How is it that I can help you in accomplishing your work?

As CEO, it is important that you demonstrate your support to your sales managers for the difficulties they raise during the meeting, as well as your willingness to help them.

Try these out and let us know how it goes!

 

About the Author

Frédéric Lucas, Prima Ressource

Frederic_LucasEntrepreneur, business owner, speaker, trainer, coach, adviser, blogger and expert about sales force performance and business growth… I’m all of it and none of it at the same time. Want to know why? I take an integrated approach to know where your company needs help to get from where it is right now to where you wanted to be. My clients know me for telling them what they need to hear, instead of what they want to hear. They value the depth of my expertise, the science behind my framework and the predictability of my insights. While most try to fix salespeople by working on factors that influence sales, I concentrate first on the scientific causes of underachievement and overachievement of sales organizations. I build profitable sales culture by working on the essential components that increase an organizations probability of generating profitable sales.

 

 

 

Re- Blogged From:- Integrity Solutions

Source:- https://www.membrain.com/blog/18-critical-questions-ceos-need-to-ask-their-sales-managers
18 CRITICAL QUESTIONS CEOS NEED TO ASK THEIR SALES MANAGERS

comm-e1506715408701

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our research shows that the salespeople who consistently outperform the rest are those who release and expand their inner achievement drive. So the big question for sales training and management professionals is: How can you help every salesperson do that?

As Mike Fisher noted in a previous blog post, start by making sure they have a clear goal that’s personally motivating. But there’s another, even more powerful factor to take into account: “self-talk.”

This refers to the conversations salespeople are continually having with themselves about themselves. A salesperson may know intellectually what they need to do (“I think” statements), but their behavior is also driven by emotional “I feel” statements. In a contest between the two, their conscious willpower is no match for their powerful emotions. The “I feel” statements always win. That’s how they end up in a dynamic that goes something like this:

I know I need to call my prospect list to build up new business, but I’m going to check in again with my favorite clients.

There’s a third dimension of self-talk at play here, too: “I am” statements. Every salesperson unconsciously answers these questions:

What does it take to be successful?

Do I have what it takes to be successful?

In other words, do I believe I can do it?

A salesperson’s “I think” statements can set goals, but if their “I am” silently screams, “You’re not capable of doing that,” doubt and anxiety will creep in and eventually sabotage their ability to sell.

These “I am” statements are like the internal programming that regulates a person’s sales, income or rewards. You can’t release more achievement drive and improve performance until you break through these limiting self-beliefs.

A 5-Step Process for Expanding Sales Success Boundaries

The important thing to realize is that salespeople can break through their current levels of self-beliefs. What follows is a five-step process to get them started. As this process demonstrates, sales training and coaching that help people uncover and develop strategies for integrating new self-beliefs is a critical piece of the puzzle.

  1. Become aware of your current behaviors. Pay attention to the conscious choices you make or actions you take, or results you expect.
  2. Notice the attitudes or feelings that seem to influence those behaviors. Ask yourself, “What’s driving me to do this action or behavior? Is it driven by confidence or fear? By the need to avoid stress, or the desire to succeed?”
  3. Attempt to connect these feelings and behaviors with the unconscious beliefs that might be driving them. It’s likely that little will “pop out” to your consciousness at first. Just keep examining and looking for answers. Soon your “I am” will send answers to your “I think.”
  4. Select new beliefs that you’d like to have embedded in your “I am.” Through self-suggestion, you can begin to send those messages down inside yourself.
  5. Have the courage to go through the change, conflict and ambiguity that come as you grow and develop new beliefs. You’ll always go through these seemingly disruptive times until new beliefs have the time to establish themselves deep within you.

Each salesperson’s current level of self-belief “programming” has been developed largely by the self-suggestions they’ve programmed into it. That’s good news, because it means that they can change it the same way. It takes consistent attention and intention on the part of the salesperson, and it requires sales coaches who understand these dynamics and can support the transformation at every step.

Re- Blogged From – Integrity Solutions

MG_9513-e1503417900403

There’s a common saying about selling in healthcare: When you understand one health system, you understand one health system.

With the increasing complexity involved in navigating complex Integrated Delivery Networks (IDNs), there are no easy solutions to winning the business. Meanwhile, as the healthcare environment moves away from the fee-for-service model to value-based care, hospital executives’ expectations are changing. For those who are selling into the so-called C-suite, including senior executives and other top leaders, that means a shift for them as well.

Adding to the challenge is the fact that senior-level audiences have different demands and expectations than many salespeople are used to dealing with. From getting the appointment to interacting during the meeting, calling on senior executives requires a more strategic approach and a different set of skills.

We recently surveyed strategic account representatives and executives in the Medical Device and Diagnostic marketplace to learn a bit more about their experiences calling on senior leaders in today’s healthcare environment. We learned that some of their top challenges include gaining access and having a compelling, value-based reason to meet, among others.

A particularly revealing data point from the survey is the fact that only 21% of respondents felt “highly confident” in their ability to bring value to an executive-level conversation. We also discovered that 18% were “not confident” that they could bring value or have had no executive conversations in the past six months.

All of these factors affect how medical device, diagnostics, pharmaceutical and other healthcare sales organizations prepare their teams to step up into the carpeted side of the hospital.

The Power of Beliefs

While salespeople need to build new skills to address the unique expectations and demands of healthcare leaders, they also need to develop the necessary mindset to call on senior executives. In fact, when it comes to selling successfully to a senior leadership audience, a salesperson’s beliefs, values and ability to create value for customers are often more influential than their selling skills.

There are five key belief dimensions that influence executive sales success:

  • View of Selling to Executives: Your belief in creating value for health systems and executives.
  • View of Abilities: Your belief you can be successful selling to this level of customers.
  • Commitment to Activities: Your willingness to do what’s necessary—applying all the tools and resources—to be successful, every single time.
  • Belief in Solutions: Your belief that what you have to offer brings value.
  • Values: You have the integrity, honesty, work ethic, credibility, etc. to excel.

How can you help your salespeople expand their beliefs? One-on-one coaching is critical. Work with them to consider new possibilities for themselves. Ask them what they might do and say that’s completely outside their comfort zone. Acknowledge that it’s perfectly normal to be nervous. And focus on helping them develop and believe in the actions, feelings, behaviors and abilities that support a successful conversation.

A Different Customer with Different Priorities

In addition to potentially self-limiting beliefs, many salespeople struggle to succeed at the executive level because they assume the same approaches they use with other customers will work here, too.

The problem is, senior executives’ priorities and goals are different. In their decision-making process, they’re thinking about specific business drivers, like enhanced patient care, cost reduction, revenue growth and third-party partnerships. What this means is that selling to them is less about asking questions and more about helping them connect the dots. The salesperson has to bring insight that aligns with the executive’s strategic imperatives and helps them solve a problem that’s bigger than what’s in the representative’s product portfolio.

Successful salespeople do this by:

  • Understanding the priorities of senior executives and how those differ from the priorities of clinical or financial decision-makers
  • Recognizing how business drivers impact decisions.
  • Knowing how and when to get involved in the decision-making process—it has to be early.
  • Researching, doing the homework and coming in to the meeting highly prepared for that strategic discussion

This last point can’t be overstated. When working with senior leaders, there are no shortcuts and often no second chances. Thorough planning, preparation and research are non-negotiables. Eighty percent of what the salesperson would typically uncover through interviewing the customer should happen instead in preparation for the conversation.

Ultimately, selling to the C-suite in healthcare is a different game, one that’s highly dependent on the person’s beliefs, values and ability to create value at a strategic level. Not everyone is cut out for it. But with the right training, coaching and tools, your executive-level salespeople can step up to the challenge, become valuable partners to their customers, and make a significant positive impact—on the business and on people’s lives.

 

By Kevin King

 

MG_2840-e1492457924939

By Steve Schmidt, Partner

“If you want to interact effectively with me, to influence me, you first need to understand me.” – Steven Covey

A powerful statement. Simple and eloquent, profound and meaningful.

Taken a step further, we might add that you also need to understand yourself. After all, you can’t really communicate effectively with someone else without first recognizing how you prefer to communicate—and how you may be perceived by that person as a result.

But once you have the foundation, the bigger leap—one that only a few truly master—is to understand and adapt to the person you’re communicating with. That’s where your biggest opportunity lies.

As most of us are keenly (and perhaps, at times, painfully) aware in our relationships outside of work, people view the world through different lenses. This, in turn, affects how they communicate and like to be communicated with. We do our best to work through the communication challenges because, as much as technology has infiltrated everything our daily lives, we still strive for those personal connections.

The same applies in the workplace. New technologies and fads come and go, but being able to understand what your customers value most and then being able to effectively communicate with them from that vantage point is often what differentiates you and your organization from your competition. It’s also what forms the basis of strong, sustainable customer relationships.

A Corporate Executive Board study found that 53% of customer loyalty is driven by the sales experience. This supports the notion that perceptions are reality. So an important question for you to think about is this: How are you perceived by those you’re communicating with? Your ability to connect with people certainly weighs on that perception.

And the next question is, are you doing everything you can to build deeper, trust-based relationships?

The Behavior Styles Connection

You probably have some familiarity with the concept of Behavior Styles. It’s literally been around forever. Even Socrates grasped the value of understanding different behavioral approaches as he helped shape Western philosophy and evolved his Socratic method. The Behavior Styles Assessment, which reveals your personal Behavior Style and helps you understand the Behavior Styles of colleagues and customers, gives you a way to create personal chemistry and build rapport with diverse people—fundamental skills in sales, management, personal relationships and everyday life.

Let’s take a closer look at how Behavior Styles can help you strengthen customer relationships and improve your sales effectiveness.

In his classic book The Loyalty Effect, Frederick F. Reichheld says that the best way to move from transactional, rational dialogue to a more meaningful exchange is to focus on creating an emotional bond. When you communicate in such a way that your clients and co-workers feel valued, the outcomes of your conversations will yield better returns.

Easier said than done? Well, with the right level of awareness and commitment, anyone can master the ability to sell, serve and coach others by understanding and adapting to different Behavior Styles. The information you learn about their Behavior Styles can help you shortcut the process of connecting with them in a more personal and meaningful way.

A rule of thumb is to follow the three A’s:

  • Awareness of your personal communication preferences and how you may be perceived by others
  • Alignment of your communication strategy to another’s, once you determine their primary Behavior Style
  • Action, including successfully adapting on the fly as you communicate with others

The Compound Effect of Loyalty

Why should you bother? Ultimately, your ability to communicate effectively with clients and prospects—to move from transactional to emotional conversations—is what can move them from neutral to satisfied to loyal. And once you reach a true “partner” status, that loyalty will compound itself. Your loyal, fully engaged clients are not only willing to spend significantly more wallet share, they’re also the ones who will go to bat for you, becoming your best sources of referrals and new business.

No matter how much technology evolves, sales is a business of relationships. Having meaningful conversations that engage people in a way that they value is always going to be one of your most powerful selling tools. And that means you have to understand their Behavior Style so that you can focus in on what they care about most.

How many of your customers are fully engaged? How might more effective, engaging communication (as defined by the customer) help you achieve both your goals and theirs?

If you’re a leader seeking that competitive advantage, ask yourself this: What am I doing to equip my team to maximize every interaction?

 

Re-blogged from Integrity Solutions

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Sales training

Originally contributed as a guest blog on SellingPower.com

By Mike Esterday

If you’re like most sales leaders, you’re constantly hunting for the “secret sauce” of sales success. You’re convinced that, once found, that secret sauce will put your organization over the top – and into the rarefied group of consistently top-performing companies.

Look no further. Chances are good that you already have all the ingredients you need. You’ve just added them to the sauce in the wrong proportions.

We recently conducted a research study in partnership with the Sales Management Association to find out what top-performing companies focus on that’s different from the others. The answers were revealing and, in some cases, surprising.

We surveyed leaders at more than 200 sales organizations. We asked them to rate how a salesperson’s achievement drive – that is, their attitudes, beliefs, and passions – affects their performance. Likewise, we asked the same of them about how a salesperson’s product knowledge and selling skills affect performance.

Here’s what may surprise you: More than 80 percent of the respondents rated achievement drive as being of equal or greater value than product knowledge and selling skills in terms of positively impacting sales performance. However, only a quarter of the respondents said they were very effective in delivering sales training that focuses around achievement drive.

That is a tremendous gap between importance and effectiveness on what is potentially the most important driver of sales success.

Here’s the kicker: Those who said they were effective at focusing sales training on achievement drive reported 20 percent stronger results than everyone else.

What about you? Does your sales training emphasize achievement drive and ignite motivation?

What’s Causing the Gap?

If so many executives recognize the value of achievement drive, then why don’t more companies address it in training?

Well, ostensibly, it’s just plain easier to provide salespeople with product information and techniques on what to say and when – and then manage numbers and activities.

But relative ease is only part of the story. In fact, there are plenty of ways leaders rationalize focusing on skill and product training – even when they agree that attitudes and achievement drive play a bigger role in performance.

Based on our study, here are the top four reasons sales leaders ignore attitude and achievement drive in sales training:

  1. Skills and product training are just easier to deliver and measure.
  2. We expect people to have this already when they’re hired.
  3. The subject matter is too personal for corporate training or coaching.
  4. We’ve never done this type of development in our organization.

This isn’t to say that training on product knowledge and selling skills isn’t important. But it will only take your team (and your organization) so far.

When training goes beyond product knowledge and techniques – when it gets to the motivating attitudes that increase achievement drive – that’s where your competitive edge lies.

Top Performers Focus on These Three Critical Conversations

So, what advice can we take away from the lessons of the top-performing companies in our study?

We learned there are three critical conversations every salesperson must focus on for the organization to consistently realize its growth goals:

  1. The conversation I have with my customers – How will I interact in ways that are seen as valuable by customers? This is where training around selling skills/methodology, account strategy, and product knowledge falls.
  2. The conversation I have with myself – Those moments of reflection, inner belief, and personal values are sometimes seen as “intangibles,” but the impact on performance is quite real. This is where training focused around achievement drive comes into play.
  3. The conversation I have with my coach – One of the key determining factors for growth is coaching. However, when and if sales coaching actually happens, it’s nearly always focused on how to improve the first conversation – a salesperson’s ability to interact effectively with the customer. It rarely addresses the other critical conversation, the one that salespeople are having all the time – with themselves.

This holistic approach to development requires ongoing commitment from the top and alignment throughout the organization. But, as our research shows, it can be the turbocharger for your success.

When you think about it, it’s not all that surprising. After all, who among us hasn’t felt the undeniable power of self-belief and self-drive? And who wouldn’t want to work for a company that is committed to developing people in a way that unleashes their inner drive and potential? And, just as important, who wouldn’t want to do business with a company that values each salesperson as a whole person – not just a selling machine?

Take a closer look at your sales training approach. Are you missing any of the key conversations that could be the “secret sauce” of your sales success?

 

Re-blogged from Integrity Solutions.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

MG_4138-e1491341480721

By Bruce Wedderburn

As a sales leader, you’re there to make a difference—a difference in team performance. You’ve looked at the range of experience on your team and seen multiple opportunities for growth, so you immediately implemented the latest sales and marketing thinking to pave the way for double-digit gains over the next 12 to 24 months. It’s the kind of vision and take-charge leadership that has impressed organizational leadership.

The only problem is, the expected sales gains from your initiatives have been slow to materialize. As the months have progressed, others in the organization have begun expressing doubts about your strategy. Worse still, you’re beginning to have your own doubts.

This isn’t unusual. As organizations look for organic growth in increasingly competitive markets, leaders are searching for the latest technology, the next app, that one competitive strategy that will elevate them above their peers. But despite all of the new advances and approaches, the reality remains: Your salespeople still have to have conversations with customers.

Another sobering reality? More than any other factor, the quantity and quality of those conversations will determine whether or not your organization reaches its sales goals this year.

We recently conducted a research study in partnership with the Sales Management Association, and the findings were illuminating. We learned that there’s not one but three critical conversations every salesperson must focus on for the organization to consistently realize its growth goals. Improving any one of these will increase your team’s productivity. Improve all three and you’re on your way to a breakout year.

Here’s what those conversations are:

  1. The conversation that salespeople have with their customers. Customers have more access to more information than ever before, and that’s driving increased commoditization in your industry. As a result, your customers’ perception of “value” has shifted from what you’re selling to how you’re selling. In other words, your salespeople’s interactions are where the real value is today—the value that will differentiate you from the competition. It’s in these critical conversations that salespeople can move the discussion away from price and begin building the elusive “Trusted Advisor” status in the customer’s mind. Succeeding with this conversation is mostly about your salespeople’s skillset.
  1. The conversation that salespeople have with themselves. These are the conversations that all of us have dozens, if not hundreds, of times each day. We each have a set of inner beliefs about who we are and the level of success we deserve to enjoy. Countless external influences over the course of our lives—parents, friends, relatives, teachers, co-workers, clients, spouses, good experiences, negative ones, highs, lows—have contributed to these beliefs and shaped who we are, our level of confidence and what we say to ourselves about ourselves. For salespeople, this inner talk affects what level of buyer they will call on, how many customer meetings they will have, how they feel about prospecting, how they respond to being coached, their vision for their career, how they handle rejection, how they handle success, whether or not they will improve, and the hundreds of experiences that make up a sales or management career. This all affects a person’s attitude and confidence. Succeeding with this conversation is mostly about the salesperson’s mindset.
  1. The conversation that salespeople have with their coach. Coaching is a key determining factor for growth and one of the great buzzwords of our times. However, when and if sales coaching actually happens, it’s nearly always focused on how to improve the first conversation—a salesperson’s ability to interact effectively with the customer. It rarely addresses the other critical conversation, the one that both salespeople and managers are having all the time—with themselves.

What the Pros Know About Success

Professional athletes know that the three S’s— stamina, strength and stretching—are essential for success, and so they constantly work at training and developing all three. Most recreational athletes, on the other hand, work at improving only one or occasionally two of these critical fitness qualities.

In the same way, all three success conversations can and should be constantly developed. Your salespeople’s skillset and mindset can both be improved through training and coaching. And when their skillset and mindset are working together, supported by effective coaching of both, your sales organization will be on the way to new levels of success and satisfaction.

Too many organizations look to external factors such as new technologies and the latest fads for the answers to growth. That’s like a professional tennis player who looks to the latest advances in racquet string technology, cloud-based ball tracking systems and energy-rebounding shoe design while overlooking the importance of improving foot-speed, confidence and fitness.

Without mastering what’s most important, the rest doesn’t matter.

What conversations are your salespeople having?

 

Re-blogged from Integrity Solutions

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

“Baseball is 90% mental. The other half is physical.” -Yogi Berra

I love that quote. It fits so well into the world of sales, where salespeople are regularly expected to give more than 100%. And while it’s certainly true that half of sales success can be attributed to skills, it’s also true that there is a strong mental component to being “at the top of your game.” In both professions, coaches have to focus on more than just the player’s tactical skills. They need to focus on the whole person: body and mind.

What good coaching looks like?

At CSO insights, we define coaching as “a process which uses structured conversations to help salespeople develop their performance in the short and long term.” I like that definition for several reasons:

  • It focuses on the dialogue that needs to happen between salesperson and manager. Coaching is not about performing the role for the salesperson—a trap many first-time sales managers fall into. Coaching is not about telling what to do. Instead, it’s about asking the right questions to help the salesperson develop adaptive selling skills that allow them to reach ever-higher levels of performance and self-sufficiency in a dynamic selling environment.
  • These conversations are structured, following a proven approach for improving performance in sales and service roles, tailored along the entire customer’s journey. They are not drive-by criticisms that leave the struggling person more demoralized than motivated. Nor are they “atta-boy” comments about good performance that do nothing to turn around problem areas.
  • The focus is on both the short- and long-term performance goals. Coaching that focuses only on the short term will never create sustainable performance improvements.

Our work also emphasizes the need for front-line managers to focus both on managing the activities and coaching the related behaviors that lead to results and can be managed directly. That last component is vitally important. Many new managers make the mistake of focusing on end results, e.g., quota attainment, but not enough on how to get there. In their defense, it’s often not their fault. This is the way they were managed, and they are just modeling the non-coaching behavior of their previous bosses.

The problem is that you can’t really “manage” a quota or revenue. You can only manage the activities and the related behaviors—pre-call prep, adherence to proven sales methodologies, tailoring the value messages, collaborative selling techniques, etc.—that lead to this desired outcome.

The conference on the mound

Baseball isn’t nearly as popular in Europe as it is in the U.S., but given how much traveling I do in America, I’ve watched a game or two. I can’t say that I’ve grasped all the nuances yet, but one aspect of the game fascinates me: the conference on the mound. To me, this is coaching put to the test.

This conference seems to happen most often when a pitcher is struggling. The coach, followed by the catcher, trots out to the mound for a short, private confab with the pitcher. I’m not sure what gets said, but I doubt the coach is instructing the pitcher on the finer points of throwing a curve ball. The time for that has passed. Nor do I think the coach is threatening the pitcher: Strike this guy out or you’re finished! That would hardly be helpful in an already stressful setting.

More than likely, the coach is sharing some perspective on the game that the pitcher doesn’t see because he’s under so much mental stress. It also seems likely that he’s offering a few words of encouragement, maybe even asking the pitcher how he’s feeling, e.g., How’s your shoulder holding out? He wants to make sure the pitcher still feels confident in his ability to perform. It’s the ultimate moment of truth for coaching because there isn’t much time for the discussion, and everyone, including the coach, is under pressure.

Sound familiar?

A typical sales or service coaching session is no less pressure-filled for all involved. And the same strategies that work so well on the mound apply here, too. That’s why Integrity Solutions’ laser-like focus on the mental side of the frontline manager’s coaching responsibilities is so important—and so effective. Their % drivers of high achievment sets a pitch-perfect tone for a productive coaching session by encouraging the coach to create a supportive environment focused on how the person can succeed rather than dwelling on what’s going wrong. Not only does this approach help the person improve their performance, it helps keep their attitude positive and their head in the game.

No matter who the players are, that’s a winning formula.

Tamara-Blue-5-213x220Guest blog contribution
By Tamara Schenk
Research Director, CSO Insights

Reblogged from Integrity Solutions.

Tags: , , , , , ,

There are two types of leaders:

First, is the leader who builds the entire organization directly under them. They are the captain. When they are around, the team thrives–and when they’re not, the team is aimless and misdirected (because that’s the dynamic they have built). They are still great, effective leaders, but the success of the team is entirely dependent upon their involvement.

The second is a leader who builds an organization around skill sets, habits, disciplines and best practices. They are involved, and everyone knows they are at the helm, but the success of the team is not entirely dependent upon them–because they have built something much different. They built a culture, not a hierarchy.

The best bosses are culture creators. They are far less interested in being “seen” as the high-and-mighty leader, and much more focused on creating an environment that allows others to thrive, take on responsibility, and ultimately grow organically.

How do they do that?

1. Routine

Effective offices have routines, just like effective people have routines. There is a Monday morning meeting. There is a Friday closing meeting. There is a mid-week standup. Whatever your routine is, as long as it creates both a sense of community and accountability, it will be effective. The purpose of routine is to remove the question of, “What do we do?” Once that is resolved, all team members can focus on more important tasks.

2. Accountability

If you have an office full of finger-pointers, no one will ever learn and grow. This starts at the top. If a leader cannot take accountability, then their managers don’t learn how to take accountability, and so on. This has to be part of your culture–and great bosses know this. It’s a matter of showing, not “talking,” and they teach the rest by first taking accountability themselves.

3. Listening

So much of teamwork comes down to listening. People will go through hell for you if they feel heard along the way. Great bosses don’t just tell people what to do. They listen. They take time along the way to address issues, concerns, feelings of unrest, etc. And in doing so, they teach others (again, through their actions) to do the same. This creates a culture that makes people feel empowered and safe to share what they think and feel, which ultimately is great for the organization as a whole.

4. Trust

There are few things as toxic as a distrustful work environment. Where people talk poorly about each other behind closed doors or in passing. In order to be an effective team, people have to feel that they can trust each other. A great boss sets this standard from the beginning. They guard that trust, and take extreme caution in upholding that standard across the board. Nobody does great work in an environment where they don’t feel emotionally safe.

5. Work Ethic

“All talk” organizations do a fantastic job at dancing around and proclaiming all the wonderful things they do, but lack the discipline to sit down and actually move the needle. A great boss does not believe his or her own hype. They know the value of staying humble and focused, and place far more energy and focus on setting the pace for quality work ethic in the office. Your work ethic is everything. Otherwise, you’re nothing but a headline in a fleeting press release.

6. Positive Feedback

There is a difference between a boss that picks work (or you, personally) apart just for the sake of it, and that same exercise being done in a constructive, helpful manner. Great bosses do this masterfully. They can provide feedback, push you, be tough on you, know just how far to test you without breaking you. And that’s crucial in order to get the best out of people. A great boss is like a great coach. There are times when you will feel extremely frustrated, even emotional, and you will feel like they are being tough on you for no reason. But down the line, you will pick your head up and you will realize the lesson they were trying to teach you. And if they have done so right, you will appreciate them for it.

7. Family

You spend more time with the people you work with than you do your own family. Great bosses don’t exploit this–they find ways to make that time investment worthwhile. They see you as family. They treat you like family. They create a culture for the organization as a whole where people look forward to seeing one another. It’s not just “an office.” It’s a workspace with people you are proud to call your “family.” The best work environments share this in common. They say, “I love the people I work with!” Because everyone feels like family.
Soure :- http://www.inc.com/nicolas-cole/7-things-all-great-bosses-implement-into-the-workplace.html

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

call-center

Companies are beginning to recognize the value in their call centers, not just as moneymakers but also as an integral part of call-centers developing long-term, business relationships. For an industry that typically tracks, measures and controls metrics like call time and volume, it’s easy to think that the value lies in data and quantitative improvements. Think again. These measures general focus on efficiency, not revenue.

Savvy companies are starting to see what was previously viewed as a necessary cost drain should now be treated as a critical component to their customer loyalty strategy—even an investment in future growth. The million-dollar questions:

How have call centers catapulted from being the low ones on the totem pole to acting as the trusted advisors contributing to profitability? And what has caused this dramatic shift?

The answer to both is, quite simply, your customers. With the rise of technology in all aspects of life, customers have gotten used to getting things done in the most efficient way possible. They no longer want or have the time to physically meet with a sales rep, nor do they want to get involved in a lengthy sales cycle. The Internet is one option, but for many, there’s still a desire for human contact, so call centers have become increasingly important.

The phone! It’s quick; it’s efficient and there’s a real person on the other end of the line. What’s more, well-trained call center professionals who have a positive outlook about sales through service are able to skillfully guide clients into additional purchases, bringing in additional revenue for the company.

The result is that the call centers have become profitable, but that’s not the only positive outcome. Call center professionals are gaining trust. They are building enduring, beneficial relationships. They are establishing a loyal customer following and helping the business deliver on its ultimate mission and purpose. Customers are not only trusting the advice; they’re learning to depend on the informed suggestions offered by skilled call center personnel. They are perceiving call center agents as partners, not just providers. Smart companies are recognizing that when they focus on partnerships, profit is the natural by-product.

There’s still work to be done. Recent research from Lee Resources revealed that 80% of companies believe that they deliver superior customer service, while only 8% of customers feel the same. And if American Express’s findings are true—that Americans tell an average of nine people about a good experience but 16 people about a bad one (and that doesn’t even include negative Facebook postings or tweets!)—then companies need to be especially worried about that huge percentage of customers who believe they’re getting less than superior service.

Yet if companies recognize that people and profit are not mutually exclusive, and if they equip their agents to engage in the dialogue that’s necessary to drive revenue, they will position themselves for long-term, positive results.

Dialogue That Pays Off

What does that dialogue look like? Here are a few of the key areas the most effective call center professionals keep top of mind and have become particularly skilled at:

  • Building trust and rapport
  • Putting customers at ease and making them feel important
  • Asking compelling questions to uncover needs
  • Following a proven, structured sales process
  • Actively listening for cues about challenges and wants
  • Understanding Behavior Styles and adjusting accordingly
  • Restating or paraphrasing points
  • Offering solutions that meet needs and create value
  • Translating product and service features into benefits

As more call centers focus on relevant, business-aligned learning and development strategies for their teams, call centers will continue to increase the top line.

The take-away? Put your money in your people. Align standards used to measure success with revenue and customer satisfaction goals, and watch your numbers go up!

 

Re- Blogged from :- Integrity Solutions

Source:- http://www.integritysolutions.com/service/call-centers-can-profit-centers-investing-dialogue

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

call-centers-391x220

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the old days, if you were a valued customer of a company (and you were, because all customers were valued in the old days), you had a specific contact through whom all transactions were processed. If your contact was on vacation, you might be forced to go through the company’s call center, but that was always a last resort because you believed that whoever answered that phone was going to be about three fries short of a Happy Meal.

Call centers didn’t earn a lot of respect from their own companies either. They were viewed strictly as a cost drain. Companies felt required to have them, but they didn’t feel required to support them with much more than the skills and tools they needed to be processors of the most mundane tasks. After all, highly trained sales representatives were there to do the heavy lifting.

But those old days are gone. The Internet came along and changed the way we do business, the way we shop, the way we entertain ourselves, the way we live. Customers began to realize that they could save time and money by conducting business online, and those personal representatives who had been so important before slowly began to fade. The times they were a-changing.

But here’s what didn’t change. Customers still wanted service. They wanted to maintain that feeling of having a business relationship. And that was no easy feat, considering that a high percentage of their transactions were done with two mouse clicks and the enter key. But occasionally, they would still need to have a little human contact, like if the website was down, or the transaction was complicated, or they had carpal tunnel. So companies had a new challenge: Re-purposing their tired call centers into profitable, customer satisfaction centers.

Enter the new and improved call center!

Today, the call center has earned a new respect, because the call center has become a company’s initial shot at true customer service. Smart companies have begun to understand that their call centers are their face, their voice and their smile. The call centers are giving them a chance to stand out against their competition. They are the one opportunity the company has to sell itself. The call centers have made a colossal shift. They’ve gone from zero to hero!

Not only have call centers, in most cases, become the company’s front line, but they’re also doing something else that they’d never done before. They’re making money! They’re no longer just overhead or a necessary evil. Because of the service they provide, in essence, they’ve been able to eliminate long selling cycles.

It’s also critical to note that call centers are not only making money, they’re saving money. With well-trained call center professionals, companies are able to reduce their sales cycle—or even their sales force. These kinds of call centers can handily pick up the slack. And the company profits soar—but not at the risk of customer satisfaction. If anything, customers are more satisfied with their experience when transacting their business through a call center, citing ease and expedience of transactions as the reason to use call centers.

There’s no denying that in the last five years, as the U.S. economy has picked up, so have revenues generated from call centers. The shift is customer driven. Companies who are listening to their customers understand that their call centers need to play a more prominent role in their overall business strategies. According to eConsultancy, a whopping 61% of consumers prefer the phone as their channel for conducting business. That should be a strong impetus for companies to make sure that their call centers are functioning efficiently, able to serve and sell value, and have customer satisfaction as their number one goal.

What are you doing to help your call center helping your business?

 

Re – Blogged From :- Integrity Solutions

 

Source:- http://www.integritysolutions.com/service/helping-call-center-help-business

Tags: , , , , , , ,

« Older entries